A Guide to Car Insurance and DUIs (Cost, Discounts, and Cheapest Options)

A DUI, or DWI, is one of the worst things you can have on your record. It could cause your insurance premiums to skyrocket—you may even lose your license. It’s not the end of the world, though. In this guide, we’ll look at the ways you can secure cheap car insurance with a DUI while also comparing average state rates for drivers with DUIs.

DUI vs DWI

DUI means “driving under the influence” while DWI stands for “driving while Intoxicated.” The differences vary from state to state, but both are used in reference to the offense of driving while influenced by drugs or alcohol.

The terms OUI and OWI are also used in a handful of states and are acronyms for “operating under the influence” and “operating while intoxicated.”

Average Car Insurance Rates for Drivers with DUIs

Car insurance rates jump by an average of 80% when you have a DUI on your record. In some states, you may be charged over 300% more on average. In Michigan, for instance, you could be quoted over $8,000 a year for full coverage car insurance once you have this on your record.

  • Alabama: $2,300 (70 to 80% Increase)
  • Alaska: $1,800 (40 to 50% Increase)
  • Arizona: $3,400 (130 to 150% Increase)
  • Arkansas: $2,400 (40 to 60% Increase)
  • California: $5,000 (170 to 190% Increase)
  • Colorado: $2,800 (60 to 70% Increase)
  • Connecticut: $3,000 (40 to 50% Increase)
  • Delaware: $3,300 (70 to 80% Increase)
  • D.C: $2,800 (40 to 50% Increase)
  • Florida: $3,600 (50 to 60% Increase)
  • Georgia: $3,200 (70 to 80% Increase)
  • Hawaii: $3,900 (200 to 220% Increase)
  • Idaho: $1,700 (60 to 70% Increase)
  • Illinois: $2,200 (70 to 90% Increase)
  • Indiana: $1,450 (30 to 40% Increase)
  • Iowa: $1,800 (60 to 70% Increase)
  • Kansas: $2,250 (50 to 60% Increase)
  • Kentucky: $2,600 (50 to 70% Increase)
  • Louisiana: $3,300 (40 to 50% Increase)
  • Maine: $1,200 (30 to 40% Increase)
  • Maryland: $2,000 (20 to 30% Increase)
  • Massachusetts: $2,700 (60 to 70% Increase)
  • Michigan: $8,000 (210 to 230% Increase)
  • Minnesota: $2,500 (80 to 90% Increase)
  • Mississippi: $2,400 (50 to 60% Increase)
  • Missouri: $2,100 (50 to 70% Increase)
  • Montana: $2,500 (50 to 60% Increase)
  • Nebraska: $2,100 (40 to 60% Increase)
  • Nevada: $2,300 (40 to 50% Increase)
  • New Hampshire: $1,850 (50 to 60% Increase)
  • New Jersey: $3,400 (130 to 150% Increase)
  • New Mexico: $2,600 (70 to 80% Increase)
  • New York: $1,800 (40 to 50% Increase)
  • North Carolina: $5,500 (330 to 380% Increase)
  • North Dakota: $2,000 (70 to 80% Increase)
  • Ohio: $1,550 (50 to 70% Increase)
  • Oklahoma: $2,100 (40 to 50% Increase)
  • Oregon: $2,100 (60 to 70% Increase)
  • Pennsylvania: $2,200 (50 to 60% Increase)
  • Rhode Island: $3,400 (60 to 70% Increase)
  • South Carolina: $2,150 (50 to 60% Increase)
  • South Dakota: $2,000 (50 to 70% Increase)
  • Tennessee: $2,200 (50 to 70% Increase)
  • Texas: $2,600 (50 to 60% Increase)
  • Utah: $1,900 (50 to 60% Increase)
  • Vermont: $1,650 (40 to 50% Increase)
  • Virginia: $1,600 (50 to 60% Increase)
  • Washington: $2,000 (40 to 50% Increase)
  • West Virginia: $2,650 (60 to 80% Increase)
  • Wisconsin: $1,600 (30 to 60% Increase)
  • Wyoming: $2,700 (60 to 80% Increase)

How to Get Cheap Car Insurance with a DUI

Following a DUI, your car insurance premiums will stay high for between 3 and 5 years on average, although it all depends on your state. Some of the ways you can reduce your premiums during this time include:

Don’t Stick with One Insurer

Just because one insurance company was the cheapest option before a DUI doesn’t mean it will remain the cheapest afterward. Shop around, compare, and you may find much cheaper rates elsewhere.

The sooner you start your search, the easier it will be.

Look for Other Discounts

A DUI isn’t the end of the world. There are other ways to reduce your premiums, and these will depend on your location, age, driving history, and other factors.

For instance, you could save a few bucks by taking a defensive driving course, purchasing a car with safety features, and opting for a mileage-based program.

Change Your Policy Options

Legally, you don’t need full coverage car insurance and could opt to remove collision coverage, comprehensive coverage, and other non-essential options. As long as you meet the state requirements, you’ll be legal.

Of course, it means you’ll be hit with a sizable bill if you hit a tree or your car is vandalized, but if it’s old and cheap, it’s a risk you can afford to take.

Shop Again in a Few Years

A DUI won’t impact your premiums forever. Give it a few years and search again. You may still be deemed a higher risk, but not as much as you were in the beginning.